Daily Links


JUNE 14TH 2021

Keith Haring, Untitled, 1982. Courtesy Guy Hepner.
  1. Parties Settle in Legal Fight Over Robert Indiana’s Legacy – After three years of courtroom hostilities, the estate of the artist Robert Indiana and the artist’s former business partner said Friday that they had agreed to settle the legal disputes that cost the estate millions of dollars. Filed in United States District Court in Manhattan, however terms of the settlement remain undisclosed – Read more on NY Times
  2. Keith Haring’s ‘Untitled’ to be Offered with Option of Paying Final Purchase Price in CryptocurrencyChristie’s will be the first major auction house in Europe to offer a work with the option for the buyer to pay the final purchase price, including Buyer’s Premium, in cryptocurrency. The sale of Keith Haring’s Untitled (1984, estimate: £3,900,000-4,500,000) will also mark the first time that a tangible work of art is being offered in Europe by an auction house with the option to pay in cryptocurrency – Read more on Artdaily
  3. What Spotify’s Broken Artist-Royalty Model Can Teach Us About Inequities in the Art Market – “In art we don’t really do contracts, and that leaves only blind trust. Perhaps some artists have been screwed by this lack of paperwork, but I’ve really benefited from it. The 50/50 sales split between artists and dealers has taken on an almost sacred status in my head, because the label to artist ratio is far more lopsided”Read more on The Gray Market
  4. Throwback: Taxman is Out for Art Market Money Laundering – The US authorities have not entirely made up their minds about how to bring the art world under a bank regulation-like AML regime. After this past January, the antiquities market is covered by the due diligence requirements originally written for banks, partly in reaction to Isis looting of ancient sites – Read more on FT
  5. Contract Killers: Artist Nancy Baker Cahill challenges the efficacy of the ‘smart contracts’ behind NFTs with an Augmented Reality Project – lawyer Sarah Odenkirk warns that the term smart contracts can be very misleading despite the term’s “soundbite appeal”. Since the contracts embedded in NFT’s are essentially just if/then statements, Odenkirk says “auto code” would be a more fitting moniker, because no actual legally binding agreements are included. For now, she adds, “real smart contracts still come from attorneys.” – Read more on Artnet News


JUNE 10TH 2021

Courtesy Lucas Matney.
  1. CryptoPunk NFT Sells For Record $11.7M In Sotheby’s Auction – A non-fungible token of digital artwork called a “CryptoPunk” sold for $11.7M. at Sotheby’s. Dubbed “CryptoPunk 7523”, the piece was bought by Shalom Meckenzie, the largest shareholder of fantasy sports and betting company DraftKings – Read more on Law360
  2. British Chinese artists call for boycott of ‘racist’ Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art – British artists of Chinese heritage are calling for a boycott of the long-established Centre for Chinese Contemporary Art (CFCCA) in Manchester, northern England, amid allegations of “deep-rooted” institutional racism – Read more on SCMP
  3. Commentary: Art museum endowments soared in the pandemic. So why sell art to pay the bills? – Call it the ‘pandemic dividend’: A rising stock market helped endowments rise as much as 40%, yet museums are still selling pieces of their collections – The LA times
  4. Gallery Weekend Brings London’s Art Scene Back to Life – The event, spread out through the city’s dealerships, brought a model tried elsewhere to one of the sector’s major capitals – The New York Times
  5. Scholars in Belgium, Frustrated With the Government’s Inertia on Restitution, Have Released Their Own Repatriation Guidelines – Concerned by what they say is the government’s lack of interest, a group of Belgian experts have drafted a set of restitution guidelines for dealing with the nation’s colonial collections – Read more on Artnet


JUNE 7TH 2021

Sotheby’s joins Decentraland. Courtesy of Sotheby’s Twitter.
  1. 10 Ways for Museums to Survive and Thrive in a Post-Covid World – (1) building collections; (2) think beyond exhibition; (3) partner beyond the art world; (4) digital, not hi-res; (5) “community” is more than a marketing term; (6) reboot, remake, recontextualize; (7) education is for everyone; (8) build less – art can handle it; (9) one mission, many forms – Read more on NY Times
  2. The Legal Implications of New Forms of Photography – Photography has always been considered a special case. Initially regarded as a reproduction tool, it was slow to be accepted as a means of artistic expression. Others saw it only as a technique and there were many debates. In the French courtroom, the legal issue has always been high since recognition as a work provides important economic prerogatives. The 1985 law marks the beginnings of an evolution by protecting photography qualified as “artistic” or “documentary” – Read more on Gazette Drouot
  3. ASIA: Sales of Artworks in Japan and The Tax System: Things You Should Know – When selling a work owned by an individual, if the sale price of one or a set of art works is 300,000 yen or less, it is considered as “movable property normally necessary for daily life” and is not subject to taxation. If you sell an art work for an amount exceeding 300,000 yen and make a profit on the sale, tax will be levied as capital gains – Read more on Art Law Word JP
  4. The Definition of Judicial Sales Scrutinized – Judicial or voluntary sale? Not always easy to decide.In a recent judgment concerning the sale of Giacometti bronzes at Artcurial, the Paris Court of Appeal covers the issue – Read more on Gazette Drouot
  5. Hobby Lobby Sues Oxford Professor Over Stolen Bible Artifacts – Craft chain Hobby Lobby is going to court again, this time to recover some $7 million it paid a former Oxford University classics professor for ancient fragments of the Christian gospels and other artifacts that turned out to be stolen – Read more on Court House News


JUNE 3rd 2021

via RISD Museum
  1. 10 Ways for Museums to Survive and Thrive in a Post-Covid World – (1) building collections; (2) think beyond exhibition; (3) partner beyond the art world; (4) digital, not hi-res; (5) “community” is more than a marketing term; (6) reboot, remake, recontextualize; (7) education is for everyone; (8) build less – art can handle it; (9) one mission, many forms – Read more on NY Times
  2. The Legal Implications of New Forms of Photography – Photography has always been considered a special case. Initially regarded as a reproduction tool, it was slow to be accepted as a means of artistic expression. Others saw it only as a technique and there were many debates. In the French courtroom, the legal issue has always been high since recognition as a work provides important economic prerogatives. The 1985 law marks the beginnings of an evolution by protecting photography qualified as “artistic” or “documentary” – Read more on Gazette Drouot
  3. ASIA: Sales of Artworks in Japan and The Tax System: Things You Should Know – When selling a work owned by an individual, if the sale price of one or a set of art works is 300,000 yen or less, it is considered as “movable property normally necessary for daily life” and is not subject to taxation. If you sell an art work for an amount exceeding 300,000 yen and make a profit on the sale, tax will be levied as capital gains – Read more on Art Law Word JP
  4. The Definition of Judicial Sales Scrutinized – Judicial or voluntary sale? Not always easy to decide.In a recent judgment concerning the sale of Giacometti bronzes at Artcurial, the Paris Court of Appeal covers the issue – Read more on Gazette Drouot
  5. Hobby Lobby Sues Oxford Professor Over Stolen Bible Artifacts – Craft chain Hobby Lobby is going to court again, this time to recover some $7 million it paid a former Oxford University classics professor for ancient fragments of the Christian gospels and other artifacts that turned out to be stolen – Read more on Court House News